Redcliffe Pier

Monday, December 12, 2011

SHELL SHOCK







 After two glorious days in Monkey Mia it was time for the tour bus to turn around and head south back to Perth, the capital of Western Australia.

We got up. finished packing and headed to the restaurant for breakfast. The Bay was beautiful and it was hard to see where the sea and sky met because they were the same colour.  The boat in the distance looked just like it was sailing into the sky.




 Then back to our cabin and one last look at the magic view and we were off to catch the bus.

First stop was Shell Beach, where the green arrow is pointing.

 Now I have seen some shell beaches before but this one was amazing. As far as you can see is shells. There are some loose ones but most are stuck together by natures cement.

 I'm photographing the loose ones in the depression but I am kneeling on the ones cemented together by a natural chemical that comes from the sea. In some places it is 10m/30ft deep.

 This stuff is called Hamelin coquina and for years it was used as a light weight building material. Hamelin Pool is the name of the place where it is found. 

 This post card shows how they cut bricks from the coquina. Now that it is a world heritage area people can no longer use the shells for bricks unless it is to restore historic buildings.

 We had morning tea in a cafe built from shell bricks.

 The shell beach was beautiful and quite isolated except for the two people way down there. Can you see two black dots? Hee hee I zoomed in and discovered that........

......they were skinny dipping grey nomads who thought they were on their own until our bus load of tourists came to annoy them with our tele photo lenses. I do feel guilty by not respecting their privacy but ..............its funny.

29 comments:

  1. Great photos! I'm sure the skinny dippers didn't care not a shy bone in their bodies. LOL

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  2. Oh - if they're going to skinny dip at a public setting, they asking for it. And they probably don't care anyway. I Southern California there's a place called Black Beach and it's all just --- that. Nothing. Nudity. NO I haven't been there, silly.....but I knew this weird very distant relative who 'partook' in that lifestyle. He's still very distant with more reasons than just that. I don't know if it is still going or not. Knowing California....probably.

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  3. I am loving the journey you are visiting some really interesting places.

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  4. That is hilarious! Thank goodness they were sitting side on. Your shock might have been somewhat greater had they been facing your naughty lens front on...we'll have to call you Paparazzi Diane from now on :)
    The shell beach is incredibly and I have learnt about something I didn't know about before today. Thank you for a most interesting post...again! I feel really sad our virtual trip with you has now almost ended :( It has been so much fun and such an education!

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  5. the shell beach and the coquina steps are amazing. we have coquinas here and our beach is named that but no steps.

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  6. What an amazing shell beach! The shell buildings must look really awesome! I'm glad they have protected it though.
    The nude bathers probably should time their swims not to coincide with bus tours. ;-)

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  7. Why are all those shell creatures dying? In future I shall be careful where I hang out, if you will excuse the dreadful pun. Never really gave much thought to telescopic lenses before. Or naughty women. Well maybe naughty women!

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  8. How interesting ! I have seen lots of shells at the English coast. In Belgium they are not many I think people collected too much. That's always the problem !

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  9. Ha-ha, those skinny dippers probably don't care about the busload of people who're visiting. They DO have all over tans! The shell beach is FANTASTIC. YOu are a star, Diane, to share this beauty with us. Thanks Jo

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  10. As Jo said, the sunbathers look quite used to getting an all over tan. Shell bricks, a new one to me.

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  11. the shell beach and the coquina are awesome!

    that looks like an amazing place to visit.

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  12. Most amusing what you manage to encounter these days on secluded beaches! Thank God they were older skinny dippers and not the leap-frogging variety - otherwise you could make heaps from your "paparazzi" talents!!! ha ha
    Incredible just how calm that water is even though it is protected from the Indian Ocean.
    Very interesting blog - shellwise and nuddy-study scoop!
    Colin (HB)

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  13. Beautiful sea and shells and very interesting. VERY interesting with your long lens...ha!

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  14. What a incredible story about the shell beaches. Had never heard about it and that they can make bricks of them. The last picture is great, I should have done the same!

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  15. shell beach is amazing. they even make buildings from it. Diane you are very naughty. old people skinny dipping deserve some privacy but i have to admit it's funny. beach wouldn't be comfy to sit on in the nude i would think.

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  16. The shells that make up the beach are so beautiful. it must have been an amazing sight to see. What a wonderful try[p you had.

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  17. That shell beach is astonishing, and what amazing building material it makes, just cut away in blocks like that.

    The well-tanned gray nomads are an interesting addition to the landscape! It can't be very comfortable sitting on those shells with an unprotected derriere.

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  18. Bonza photos especially the boat sailing in the sky in the 1st photo, i don't think the skinny dippers were to worried at all. Ya learn something new everyday i've never heard of Shell Bricks before :-).

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  19. I have never heard of this Shell Beach..amazing! And wow where that sky meets the sea? beautiful! Great trip..again :-) Thanks for taking us along..

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  20. Hahaha! Love the Grey Nomads caught out!! And now they're there for the world to see!! I'm sure they'll be mortified if they ever find out ... but I was more taken with the water clarity!!!

    The more I read of your WA adventure, the more I can't wait to see it for myself - thanx for the inspiration!

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  21. This is so fascinating. I have never seen or heard of this type of thing before. So much to learn and see.

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  22. Your photo of the blue sea and sky is stunning, and the shell beach is amazing. As for those two on the beach at the other end of your lens, perhaps there are not just grey nomads [and red ones] but a whole bunch of tan nomads out there.

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  23. I lived near a coquina beach in South Carolina several years ago, but the coquina was not nearly this deep. The bricks used in the cafe are amazing. Your photos are wonderful (as usual). I really like the picture of the boat sailing in the sky.

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  24. Hi Diane, We have been in Gatlinburg for a couple of days -enjoying the Christmas lights with friends, and also enjoying the Smokies!!!

    I'm sure that you hated leaving Monkey Mia. What a gorgeous place...Shell Beach is certainly an appropriate name... Wow!!!!

    Funny about the skinny dippers... Oh Well!!!!

    Merry Christmas.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  25. That's amazing!
    Thank you for the intersting post.
    Greetings from Switzerland
    Angela

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  26. Love that first shot of blue meeting blue - what a sight it would be to see in person!
    Such clear water and lovely beaches. I'm thinking swimming would be a little rough on the skin. To each his own.
    I'd be looking for the perfect shell. :)

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  27. Diane, your first shot of the beach and sky is just gorgeous. The colors are a beautiful blue. Funny about catching the skinny dippers, but I do not think they would care about being noticed. Interesting post on the shells and the world heritage spot.

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