Redcliffe Pier

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

HUMPYBONG HISTORY

This post is for Julie's Taphophile Tragic meme. 
 While we were on the Redcliffe Peninsula, I remembered that this was the site of the first settlement in Queensland in those days called Moreton Bay penal colony. In 1824 a small settlement was started by soldiers and convicts on the edge of the bay. Due to Aboriginal attacks, mosquito attacks, and lack of a safe anchorage the settlement was relocated to the banks of the Brisbane River in 1825 , where Brisbane stands today. The houses were left empty and the aborigines called them "oompy bong" meaning dead houses, this was anglicised to Humpybong and that is what the area is called. I thought it might be interesting to check out the cemetery for some historic graves.  To get an idea which graves to look for we went to the Information Centre but arrived five minutes after it closed. So I just chose some that interested me.

 A local told us the old graves are near the back fence, so off we went. When we arrived I discovered the sun was in the wrong place for good shots. After one shot my battery went flat and my spare was flat too. I had forgotten to charge it after the last outing. Dementia is getting closer.

 So I had to rely on old phone. This marker interested me as it was surrounded by an old iron fence, a give away for an old grave. I wondered if it was to keep out wild animals or to keep the loved one in. Another point of interest was that Thomas died on my birthday. No I wasn't born in 1889. The headstone is supported by a steel support post clipped over the top.

 The people of a nearby suburb, Woody Point, remember an old aboriginal. They often decorate with shells.flowers and artefacts.

 Unfortunately I don't have any interesting stories about the residents so I just chose some interesting graves. This one was a beautiful clean marble grave but I was astounded at the dates. Mabel lived to 106. I bet she would have some stories to tell.

This one was chock a block full of flowers (artificial) we couldn't even find any name. However there was a card and drawings left on a clip. It was a sad card from a mother to her daughter and the drawings from her sister.

26 comments:

  1. So that would be where the word humpy came from then. For non Australian readers, it means shack. Oh, that might be Australian too. A very roughly made house, sometimes a bark humpy, made of tree bark.

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  2. Andrew said it all... the bark humpy being a shelter of twigs, bark and branches somewhere in the bush. Those pioneers did it rough.

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  3. Diane what a fascinating selection ... The saggy marble work on the aboriginal grave is unusual. As for Mabel, her other half is not there ... I wonder if he is still living.

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  4. Interesting post and place to visit, Diane. Mabel must have some neat stories to be told about her lifetime.

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  5. Oh, the last one is sad. "No parent wants to bury their child."

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  6. Despite of the troubles you had (dementia? haha), you made some beautiful pictures of the graves. The last one is a sad one. New graves I always find a bit creepy, they are so close to your own life.

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  7. That would probably be an interesting cemetery to return to, Diane, under less trying circumstances. I have two batteries, and also ensure that at least the spare is fully charged and in the front of my backpack. I would be devastated to find myself cameraless and a long way from home, with nothing to show for an excursion.

    I did a double flip with old Mabel's dates. I bet she was a little wizened old lady by the time SHE died. Probably fit into the coffin of a young child.

    As for that flower encrusted 'bed'. How overwhelmingly sad.

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  8. Hi ... I'm new to your page! I like Redcliffe too, and enjoyed reading about the origin of the word Humpybong. Delightful photographs and congratulations on such an interesting page ... Leanne

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  9. i like that name and the story behind how it came to be. and the grave of the aboriginal is something i will never see here. i do like old gravestones.

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  10. Hee hee, glad I'm not the only one intrigued by cemeteries. You did great with the photos!

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  11. I'm looking forward next week to seeing a photo of the grounds overlooking the ocean.

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  12. Good article, I heard that it is a tradition that aboriginals should not be confronted with the name of a deceased tribe members. It this true.

    Greetings,
    Filip

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  13. Sorry Kathy to mislead you. The cemetery doesn't overlook the ocean. However, the resort where we stayed did overlook Moreton Bay.

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  14. A very interesting post. also enjoyed reading all the comments.

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  15. Hi Diane, Interesting cemetery... Yes---I'll bet that the lady who lived to be 106 really had some stories to tell...We try to get Dad Adams to talk to us about his past... Since his mind is leaving him, he can't remember too much of his life many years ago. He does remember moving from one place to another when he was a boy --on a horse-drawn wagon!!!

    Thanks for a great post.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  16. Sammy Bell's headstone is really interesting and unusual. After being caught out somewhere I am unlikely to return to, I travel with 3 batteries - one in, one spare, one charging.

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  17. Why is it that batteries only go out at the most inconvenient times? You got some good pictures with your cell phone, though. Thanks for sharing this interesting cemetery with us.

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  18. Diane, I was wondering what the meaning of Humpybong was. It is so interesting to find out the where and why of funny names used to name places. I like old cemeteries, I used to go and have a look at the ones in the Clarence Valley, around Maclean and Grafton. I like the old gravestone and how you took the photo. It adds to its age.

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  19. That last photo got me all teary eyed. Someone way too young.
    To answer your question, a muddler is a bar tool, that is used to mash up fruit (limes, etc) or mint leaves with the sugar at the bottom of the glass before alcohol is poured over it. (like they do for caipirinhas or mojitos.)

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  20. Diane, more interesting photos and things to learn. There are certainly some funny place names, so that's one explained and a few hundred more to go.

    Filip, there are many different indigenous peoples here, but generally on the mainland Aboriginals will not use the name of someone who has passed on. There are many different taboos and rules for talking to people of different relationships.

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  21. Thanks for reminding me that I have to charge my battery ! I forgot. The cemetary looks quiet interesting especially the old grave the modern one "in loving memory" looks exactly like the grave my grandma + pa had. Now it's gone I didn't want to pay for more 10 years ! The grave is 600 km from here ! My heart is nearer !

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  22. An interesting of selection of graves .... imagine living for 106:years. . My! Wouldn't Mabel have seen some changes.

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  23. Beautiful pictures. Imagine living to 106 and all the changes you would have seen.

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  24. Great pics I love the grave with the shells. We are always collecting shells and stones and driftwood. So sad about the last one. The worst thing wich can happen to you is loosing a child

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  25. Hi Diane, I have had to make sure that as soon as I have changed batteries (and return home) I charge the flat ones. Else I'm also caught short. Your post is so interesting and the last photo very sad. I've linked your post to mine tomorrow as I managed to fix my editor problem thanks to you! Greetings Jo

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