New Farm Park, Brisbane

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

A LONG DRIVE THROUGH THE OUTBACK (Savannah Way 10)

The next leg of our trip was from Adels Grove to Pungalina Station. (see map). We left early and drove all day in the small 4 wheel drive coach stopping every two hours for a leg stretch or a picnic snack.
There were miles of nothing.

Sometimes we saw some interesting wild life. These Sarus Cranes were doing a courtship dance.

We stopped in this little town of Gregory Downs for a wee break. This was one of the few buildings in the main street.

 For morning tea we pulled off the road near a pretty river crossing. The Gregory river.

After many more miles we stopped at Doomadgee aboriginal community to pick up supplies for our next stay at a camp site. After a while we stopped at Hell's Gate Roadhouse for lunch. It was a lonely roadhouse with two women running it.

 It wasn't long before we reached the border of the Northern Territory and Queensland.

 It was hard to photograph the kangaroos through the bus window. We stopped at Borroloola, another small settlement but with a big supermarket and mobile phone connection. The first for a few days.

 The driver stopped near some Turkey Bush for our next leg stretch. It was growing everywhere.

Late edit because I was asked how the bush got its name: It is thought that the bush Turkey is so named because the Plains Turkey would seek refuge amongst its foliage when pursued by hunters.
 Finally we arrived at the Pungalina turn off but it was another two hours drive into the camp site. The road was very rough and bumpy. Sometimes we were grinding through thick sand and other times bouncing over big rocky outcrops. It was a fun experience.

The Pungalina Satation was a cattle station of over 300,000 hectares. However, it wasn't a viable business and it was bought by the Australian Wildlife Conservancy. A group of people who want to bring failed properties back to the original, natural state. They try to eradicate all feral animals such as pigs, water buffalo and cattle.

Our tour company support and donate to AWC so they were allowed to build a campsite exclusively for their tourists.



Fianally we arrived in a lovely piece of paradise in the middle of nowhere with a babbling brook running along the edge of the camp. There was a camp kitchen and a trailer of supplies. The driver and his wife cooked for us. The next day's activities would include a helicopter ride.

19 comments:

  1. love thge last three pics and my favorite today??? Kangaroos... oh wow. i would love to see them. i do love that dirt road... what a trip this was... i like that river crossing to... looking for crocodiles in that one.

    ReplyDelete
  2. your photos are so huge but nature amazing Europeans

    ReplyDelete
  3. your country is so huge not photos sorry for the mistake

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very informative post and excellent photography.
    You are doing the Australian Tourism Commission a favour
    with your odyssey travel, reports and photos.
    Heartiest Congratulations.
    Colin

    ReplyDelete
  5. The first photo looks like a painting. I can now appreciate why ToH did not want to travel. There is a lot of bus sitting but clearly worth the effort.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I've had visitors and not had time for leisurely visiting blogs. How wonderful to now have have an hour to spend here. I have so few regrets in life, but one of them is that I never got to explore the north properly when I lived in Mt Isa and Richmond. But you have taken me back to a few places I did visit and brought me close to a nostalgic tear - the Gregory, Lawn Hill and Borroloola. Di, I read on one of your posts the name of the company you toured with but can't find it again. Can you let me know what it was, please.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wow quite an experience. Love the campsite, what a great way to end the day. Sorry I have not been visiting, but after being away for a month, and we are now redecorating our house after 10 years - time is at a minimum. I hope to be back to normal soon but with over 2000 holiday photos to go through..... Take care Diane

    ReplyDelete
  8. I can imagine how fabulous that camp looked after all that back country! What an adventure and the turkey bush is very interesting. How did it get its name.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wondered that myself but never found out. I don't know. Sorry.

      Delete
    2. I asked mr Google: It is thought that the Turkey Bush is so named because the Plains Turkey (Ardeotis australis) would seek refuge amongst its foliage when pursued by hunters.

      Delete
  9. Oh my gosh what a pair of adventurers you are! You are really making the most of your retirement Diana.. this is probably a little like the equivalent of an African safari, without the lions, elephants and a few other animals :)Looking forward to seeing a bit more of the camp.

    ReplyDelete
  10. What a trip into the wilderness. It looks like a grand adventure. Did you have to lookout for snakes?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes but more importantly we had to keep watch for crocodiles.

      Delete
  11. How interesting.... I enjoyed your garden pictures from Cairns. Quite a contrast to the barren outback, wasn't it? What were the temperature changes? It's great that you are getting to explore more of your huge country... AWESOME... Love the Turkey Bush.... How did it get that name?

    Hugs,
    Betsy

    ReplyDelete
  12. Wow. I bet this was a trip of a lifetime! Maybe one day, I'll get to see it but for now, I'll just enjoy your photos!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Wow -- i will never again use the term 'Outback' when referring to far-Eastern Oregon (although people do call it that, it definitely pales in comparison to your real thing!) What a journey -- we would enjoy it though. Your photography makes me feel like I was along for the journey -- without the bumpy ride though.... but I can imagine that, bymultiplying the kinds of primitive roads our little excuse for outback has by a good factor!

    ReplyDelete
  14. The lack of mobile coverage is why I can't do trips to these places until I retire. I love that flower.

    ReplyDelete