New Farm Park, Brisbane

Friday, March 25, 2016

OH MY! OAMARU.

Oamaru is a town between Christchurch and Dunedin in New Zealand. In the 1880's Oamaru was one of New Zealands biggest towns. It was a bustling harbour town exporting and importing goods for the local farms and the interior.
The discovery of an excellent building material, limestone, contributed to the towns appearance of a permanent and stable town. Because the stone was easily carved and fashioned, stonemasons revelled in the creation of the fashionable classical architecture. Their skills gave Oamaru some of the finest 19th century streetscapes in New Zealand.
Due to the shift in commerce and the closure of the port in the 70's, it has allowed the area to stay in tact. Now the Victorian Precinct of Oamaru is a popular tourist attraction.
There are too many buildings to post but here are some that I liked very much.
 Beautiful buildings line Thames Street. The first on the left is the National bank originally built for the Bank of Otago in 1871.  The neighbouring building is the Forrester Gallery which was the Bank of New South Wales built in 1883. Both buildings were designed by Robert Lawson. 

The North Otago Museum  was originally the Atheneum (library) and Mechanics Institute. It was built in 1882 and designed by Forrester and Lemon.

 Two of my favourites were the St Luke's Anglican Church started in 1886 but was added to in 1876, 1913 and 1922. The other is the Waitaki District Council but it used to be the Post Office built in 1883 but the clock tower was added in1903.

 The Wool Store and Critereon Hotel. The hotel was built in 1887 but closed in 1906. It reopened in 1998 and it is administered by the Oamaru Whitestone Civic Trust formed to buy and restore buildings in the old town area.

The Steam Punk Museum was originally Hood and Shennan's Drapery and later the AMP Society. Steam punk is a quirky and fun genre of science fiction that features steam-powered technology.

 This lovely Victorian lady spent some time telling us about the buildings. Both the gallery and bank have luxuriant acanthus leaves carved on the capitals of their Corinthian Columns.
I would have liked to spend longer here but we had to drive on to the Moeraki Boulders and Dunedin before nightfall.

26 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you. I use Lightroom to process my photos.

      Delete
  2. Beautiful buildings Diane. Love them like that.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fabulous photos and interesting buildings. The older the building the more character it has. Happy Easter, t'other Diane

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's really amazing ! It looks like England ! The immigrants did an excellent job ! They copied their home architecture ! How interesting !

    ReplyDelete
  5. I would have never expected to encounter such buildings in New Zealand, though there's no earthly reason why not. It's just not photographed often enough.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hello, Diane! They are all beautiful buildings. I especially love the church and the Victorian Lady. Happy Friday, enjoy your weekend.

    Happy Easter to you and your family!

    ReplyDelete
  7. so much beautiful architecture here..i especially like the old library building.. glad they preserved all this

    ReplyDelete
  8. Diane your photos are really interesting. Happy Easter for you and your family. Gosia

    ReplyDelete
  9. Super photos of a lovely looking town Diane. I enjoyed the lady in the Victorian outfit too.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Wonderful architecture Diane and what a big wide open boulevard allowing the buildings to be shown off and not crammed in side by side as is usually the case. Everything looks so neat & tidy !

    ReplyDelete
  11. The buildings are magnificent. Thanks for sharing them with us.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I haven't been to Oamaru since the 60s and, from your photos it doesn't look much different but, to be honest my memory of it isn't very clear. Lovely photos, Di.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love the way that light hits carved sandstone and makes it glow. I would also love to get to that steampunk museum!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thank you for sharing, such interesting reading.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Interesting how the discovery of limestone created this fascinating city. Certainly is like the whole town is a living architectural history experience. Not a science fiction reader, but learned about steampunk a couple of years ago from comments (and further reading) after I posted a picture of a statue made in that style.

    ReplyDelete
  16. How wonderful Diane, beautiful architectural style and shown perfectly here, must have been brilliant to see. 1st and 4th shot fabulous!

    ReplyDelete
  17. How wonderful Diane, beautiful architectural style and shown perfectly here, must have been brilliant to see. 1st and 4th shot fabulous!

    ReplyDelete
  18. What pretty buildings, place. Love the quaint buildings

    ReplyDelete
  19. What a beautiful town with so much history and gorgeous buildings. I love the church too...

    I keep thinking that the area around Christchurch has had so many terrible earthquakes... I assume that none has hit THIS area... What a horrible shame it would be to lose these buildings..

    Hugs,
    Betsy

    ReplyDelete
  20. Such elegant buildings. Those Victorians knew a thing or two.

    ReplyDelete
  21. What a great idea to use the local limestone to create such wonderful architecture. I'm sure such solid looking buildings will last a long time.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I love all the old limestone buildings in Oamaru. You made some great shots of it.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Very nice buildings, Happy Easter.

    Greetings,
    Filip

    ReplyDelete
  24. Oh I remember this town. Stopped on the way to Dunedin but didn't have enough time to explore the many interesting buildings. Enjoyed reading your post.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Oamaru looks very pretty and very Victorian, Diane. I often wonder how that era was able to build so many magnificent buildings and our modern era builds so many ugly, plain ones?

    ReplyDelete